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Curling deutsch

curling deutsch

Deutsche Übersetzung von "curling" | Der offizielle Collins Englisch-Deutsch Wörterbuch online. Über Deutsche Übersetzungen von Englische Wörtern. Viele übersetzte Beispielsätze mit "curling" – Deutsch-Englisch Wörterbuch und Suchmaschine für Millionen von Deutsch-Übersetzungen. Viele übersetzte Beispielsätze mit "curling" – Deutsch-Englisch Wörterbuch und Suchmaschine für Millionen von Deutsch-Übersetzungen.

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The Royal Montreal Curling Club, the oldest active athletic club of any kind in North America, was established in Method for shaping hair and curling sheet with superabsorbent material. Das Gemälde zeigt auf der vorderen Eisfläche ein dem Curling ähnliches Spiel. Im weiteren Spielverlauf hat immer diejenige Mannschaft das Recht des letzten Steins, die das vorherige End verloren hat. Die korrekte sprachliche Einordnung und Bewertung der Beispielsätze ist für einen Sprachanfänger oder Schüler der Grund- und Mittelstufen nicht immer einfach. Ausnahmen sind internationale Turniere, wo für eine Nation gespielt wird, oder nationale Meisterschaften, bei denen das Team den Namen des Klubs trägt, für den es antritt. Each of said machine modules has several processing assemblies for drawing and curling one of the threads and a spooling unit for winding the thread. Wenn Sie es aktivieren, können sie den Vokabeltrainer und weitere Funktionen nutzen. Im Web und als APP. Zur mobilen Version wechseln. Für jeden Sieg gibt es einen Punkt. Geschieht dies vorher unabsichtlich, so darf der Stein Beste Spielothek in Weitin finden an paypal zahlung funktioniert nicht alte Stelle gelegt werden. Wenn der Online casino best welcome bonus die Steine abspielt, übernimmt er das Anzeigen des Ziels. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Dadurch sollen sich die Bwin download mit so wenig Reibung Beste Spielothek in Frohnsdorf finden möglich fortbewegen. Nach jedem End müssen die beiden Thirds eine Einigung darüber erzielen, welches Team wie viele Punkte erzielt hat. Das Spielsystem bei internationalen Wettkämpfen besteht aus einem Round-Robin -Verfahren, in der jede Nation gegen alle anderen spielt. Während des Spiels tragen die Curler speziell angefertigte God of thunder. Preisgünstige Slider können mit einem elastischen Band an ganz gewöhnlichen Schuhen befestigt werden. Gerät zum Schlitzen und Ringeln von Zierverpackungsbändern.

If the teams are tied at the end of the game, play continues for as many ends as may be required to break the tie.

The winner is the team with the highest score after all ends have been completed see Scoring below. A game may be conceded if considered unwinnable.

International competitive games are generally ten ends, so most of the national championships that send a representative to the World Championships or Olympics also play ten ends.

However, there is a movement on the World Curling Tour to make the games only eight ends. In international competition, each side is given 73 minutes to complete all of its throws.

Each team is also allowed two minute-long timeouts per end game. If extra ends are required, each team is allowed 10 minutes of playing time to complete its throws and one added second timeout for each extra end.

However, the "thinking time" system, in which the delivering team's game timer stops as soon as the shooter's rock crosses the t-line during the delivery, is becoming more popular, especially in Canada.

This system allows each team 38 minutes per 10 ends, or 30 minutes per 8 ends, to make strategic and tactical decisions, with 4 minutes and 30 seconds an end for extra ends.

The skip , or the captain of the team, will usually determine the required weight , turn , and line of the stone.

These will be influenced by the tactics at this point in the game, which may involve taking out, blocking or tapping another stone.

The skip may communicate the weight , turn , line, and other tactics by calling or tapping a broom on the ice. In the case of a takeout, guard, or a tap, the skip will indicate the stones involved.

Before delivery, the running surface of the stone is wiped clean and the path across the ice swept with the broom if necessary, because any dirt on the bottom of a stone or in its path can alter the trajectory and ruin the shot.

Intrusion by a foreign object is called a pick-up or pick. The thrower throws from the hack. Another player, usually the skip, is stationed behind the button to determine the tactics, weight , turn , and line , and the other two may sweep in front of the stone to influence the trajectory see Sweeping , below.

The players, with the exception of the skip, take turns throwing and sweeping; when one player e. When the skip throws, the third, or vice-skip, takes his role.

The thrower's gripper shoe with the non-slippery sole is positioned against one of the hacks; for a right-handed curler the right foot is placed against the left hack and vice versa for a left-hander.

The thrower, now in the hack , lines the body up with shoulders square to the skip's broom at the far end for line.

The stone is placed in front of the foot now in the hack. Rising slightly from the hack, the thrower pulls the stone back some older curlers may actually raise the stone in this backward movement then lunges smoothly out from the hack pushing the stone ahead while the slider foot is moved in front of the gripper foot, which trails behind.

The thrust from this lunge determines the weight and hence the distance the stone will travel. While not compulsory, most curlers deliver the stone while sliding out from the hack.

Balance may be assisted by a broom held in the free hand with the back of the broom down so that it slides.

One older writer suggests the player keep "a basilisk glance" at the mark. There are two current types of delivery, the common flat-foot deliver as well as the Manitoba tuck delivery where the curler slides on the front ball of his foot.

The stone is released as the thrower approaches the hog line, at which point the turn is imparted by a slight clockwise or counter-clockwise twist of the handle from around the two or ten o'clock position to the twelve o'clock on release.

The stone must be released before its front edge crosses the near hog line, and it must clear the far hog line or else be removed from play hogged ; an exception is made if a stone fails to come to rest beyond the far hog line after rebounding from a stone in play just past the hog line.

The release rule is rarely enforced in club play unless abuse is suspected. However, in major tournaments it is strictly enforced; the "eye on the hog" sensor in the stone will indicate whether the stone has been legally thrown or not.

The lights on the stone handle will either light up green, indicating that the stone has been legally thrown, or red, in which case the illegally thrown stone will be immediately pulled from play instead of waiting for the stone to come to rest.

After the stone is delivered, its trajectory is still influenced by the two sweepers under instruction from the skip. Sweeping is done for several reasons: When sweeping, pressure and speed of the brush head are key in slightly increasing the layer of moisture that builds up under the stone.

One of the basic technical aspects of curling is knowing when to sweep. When the ice in front of the stone is swept, a stone will usually travel both farther and straighter.

In some situations, one of the two alterations in path is not desirable. For example, a stone may have too much weight, but require sweeping to prevent curling into a guard.

The team must decide which is better: Much of the yelling that goes on during a curling game is the skip calling the line of the shot and the sweepers calling the weight.

The skip evaluates the path of the stone and calls to the sweepers to sweep as necessary to maintain the intended track.

The sweepers themselves are responsible for judging the weight of the stone, ensuring the length of travel is correct and communicating the weight of the stone back to the skip.

Some teams use stopwatch timing, from back line to the nearest hog line as a sweeping aid. Many teams use the Number System to communicate in which of 10 playable zones it is estimated the stone will stop.

Usually, the two sweepers will be on opposite sides of the stone's path, although depending on which side the sweepers' strengths lie this may not always be the case.

Speed and pressure are vital to sweeping. In gripping the broom, one hand should be one third of the way from the top non-brush end of the handle while the other hand should be one third of the way from the head of the broom.

The angle of the broom to the ice should be so that the most force possible can be exerted on the ice. The precise amount of pressure may vary from relatively light brushing "just cleaning" - to ensure debris will not alter the stone's path to maximum-pressure scrubbing.

Sweeping is allowed anywhere on the ice up to the tee line , as long as it is only for one's own team stones. Once the leading edge of a team stone crosses the tee line only one player may sweep it.

Additionally, when a stone crosses the tee line, one player from the other team is allowed to sweep it. This is the only case that a stone may be swept by an opposing team member.

In international rules, this player must be the skip; or if the skip is throwing, then the sweeping player must be the third. Occasionally, players may accidentally touch a stone with their broom or a body part.

This is often referred to as burning a stone. Players touching a stone in such a manner are expected to call their own infraction as a matter of good sportsmanship.

Touching a stationary stone when no stones are in motion there is no delivery in progress is not an infraction unless the stationary stone is struck in such a manner that its position is altered , and is a common way for the skip to indicate a stone that is to be taken out.

When a stone is touched when stones are in play, the remedies vary [31] [54] between placing the stones as they end up after the touch, replacing the stones as they would have been if no stone were touched, or removal of the touched stone from play.

In non-officiated league play, the skip of the non-offending team has the final say on where the stones are placed after the infraction. Many different types of shots are used to carefully place stones for strategic or tactical reasons; they fall into three fundamental categories as follows:.

Guards are thrown in front of the house in the free guard zone , usually to protect the shot-rock the stone closest to the button at the time or to make the opposing team's shot difficult.

Guard shots include the centre-guard , on the centreline and the corner-guards to the left or right sides of the centre line.

See Free Guard Zone below. Draws are thrown only to reach the house. Draw shots include raise and angle-raise , come-around , and freeze shots.

Takeouts are intended to remove stones from play and include the peel , hit-and-roll and double shots. For a more complete listing, see Glossary of curling terms.

Until five stones have been played three from the side without hammer, and two from the side with hammer , stones in the free guard zone stones left in the area between the hog and tee lines, excluding the house may not be removed by an opponent's stone, although they can be moved as long as they are not taken out of play.

These are known as guard rocks. If a guard rock is removed under this rule, it is placed back in the positions it was in before the shot was thrown, and the opponent's stone is removed from play and cannot be replayed.

This rule is known as the five-rock rule or the free guard zone rule previous versions of the free guard zone rule only limited removing guards from play in the first three or four rocks, known as the "three-rock rule" and "four-rock rule" respectively.

This rule, a relatively recent addition to curling, was added in response to a strategy of "peeling" opponents' guard stones knocking them out of play at an angle that caused the shooter's stone to also roll out of play, leaving no stones on the ice.

A team in the lead would often employ this strategy during the game. By knocking all stones out, the opponents could at best score one point if they had the hammer.

Alternatively, the team with the hammer could peel rock after rock, which would blank the end, keeping the last rock advantage for another end.

This strategy had developed mostly in Canada as ice-makers had become skilled at creating a predictable ice surface and the adoption of brushes allowed greater control over the rock.

While a sound strategy, this made for an unexciting game. Observers at the time noted that if two teams equally skilled in the peel game faced each other on good ice, the outcome of the game would be predictable from who won the coin flip to have last rock or had earned it in the schedule at the beginning of the game.

The Brier was considered by many curling fans as boring to watch because of the amount of peeling and the quick adoption of the Free Guard Zone the following year reflected how disliked this aspect of the game had become.

The free guard zone was originally called the Modified Moncton Rule and was developed from a suggestion made by Russ Howard for the Moncton cashspiel with the richest prize ever awarded at the time in a tournament in Moncton , New Brunswick , in January This method of play was altered by restricting the area in which a stone was protected to the free guard zone only for the first four rocks thrown and adopted as a Four-rock Free Guard Zone for international competition shortly after.

Canada kept to the traditional rules until a three-rock Free Guard Zone rule was adopted for the —94 season.

After several years of having the three-rock rule used for the Canadian championships and the winners then having to adjust to the four-rock rule in the World Championships, the Canadian Curling Association adopted the four-rock Free Guard Zone in the — season.

One strategy that has been developed by curlers in response to the Free Guard Zone Kevin Martin from Alberta is one of the best examples is the "tick" game, where a shot is made attempting to knock tick the guard to the side, far enough that it is difficult or impossible to use but still remaining in play while the shot itself goes out of play.

The effect is functionally identical to peeling the guard but significantly harder, as a shot that hits the guard too hard knocking it out of play results in its being replaced, while not hitting it hard enough can result in its still being tactically useful for the opposition.

There is also a greater chance that the shot will miss the guard entirely because of the greater accuracy required to make the shot.

Because of the difficulty of making this type of shot, only the best teams will normally attempt it, and it does not dominate the game the way the peel formerly did.

Steve Gould from Manitoba popularized ticks played across the face. These are easier to make because they impart less speed on the object stone, therefore increasing the chance that it remains in play even if a bigger chunk of it is hit.

With the tick shot reducing the effectiveness of the four-rock rule, the Grand Slam of Curling series of bonspiels adopted a five-rock rule in Last-rock or last-stone advantage in an end is called the hammer.

Before the game, teams typically decide who gets the hammer in the first end either by chance such as a coin toss , by a "draw-to-the-button" contest, where a representative of each team shoots to see who gets closer to the centre of the rings, or, particularly in tournament settings like the Winter Olympics, by a comparison of each team's win-loss record.

In all subsequent ends, the hammer belongs to the team that did not score in the preceding end. In the event that neither team scores, the hammer remains with the same team.

Naturally, it is easier to score points with the hammer than without; in tournament play, the team with the hammer generally tries to score two or more points.

If only one point is possible, the skip will often try to avoid scoring at all in order to retain the hammer until the next end, when two or more points may lie.

This is called a blank end. Scoring without the hammer is commonly referred to as stealing , or a steal , and is much more difficult. Curling is a game of strategy, tactics and skill.

The strategy depends on the team's skill, the opponent's skill, the conditions of the ice, the score of the game, how many ends remain and whether the team has last-stone advantage the hammer.

A team may play an end aggressively or defensively. Aggressive playing will put a lot of stones in play by throwing mostly draws; this makes for an exciting game and is very risky but the reward can be very great.

Defensive playing will throw a lot of hits preventing a lot of stones in play; this tends to be less exciting and less risky. A good drawing team will usually opt to play aggressively, while a good hitting team will opt to play defensively.

If a team does not have the hammer in an end, it will opt to try to clog up the four-foot zone in the house to deny the opposing team access to the button.

This can be done by throwing "centre line" guards in front of the house on the centre line, which can be tapped into the house later or drawn around.

If a team has the hammer, they will try to keep this four-foot zone free so that they have access to the button area at all times.

A team with the hammer may throw a corner guard as their first stone of an end placed in front of the house but outside the four-foot zone to utilize the free guard zone.

Corner guards are key for a team to score two points in an end, because they can either draw around it later or hit and roll behind it, making the opposing team's shot to remove it more difficult.

Ideally, the strategy in an end for a team with the hammer is to score two points or more. Scoring one point is often a wasted opportunity, as they will then lose last-rock advantage for the next end.

If a team cannot score two points, they will often attempt to "blank an end" by removing any leftover opposition rocks and rolling out; or, if there are no opposition rocks, just throwing the rock through the house so that no team scores any points, and the team with the hammer can try again the next end to score two or more with it.

Generally, a team without the hammer would want to either force the team with the hammer to only one point so that they can get the hammer back or "steal" the end by scoring one or more points of their own.

Generally, the larger the lead a team will have in a game, the more defensively they should play. By hitting all of the opponent's stones, it removes opportunities for their getting multiple points, therefore defending the lead.

If the leading team is quite comfortable, leaving their own stones in play can also be dangerous. Guards can be drawn around by the other team, and stones in the house can be tapped back if they are in front of the tee line or frozen onto if they are behind the tee line.

A frozen stone is difficult to remove, because it is "frozen" in front of and touching to the opponents stone. At this point, a team will opt for "peels", meaning that the stones they throw will be to not only hit their opposition stones, but to roll out of play as well.

Peels are hits that are thrown with the most amount of power. It is not uncommon at any level for a losing team to terminate the match before all ends are completed if it believes it no longer has a realistic chance of winning.

Competitive games end once the losing team has "run out of rocks"—that is, once it has fewer stones in play and available for play than the number of points needed to tie the game.

Most decisions about rules are left to the skips, although in official tournaments, decisions may be left to the officials.

However, all scoring disputes are handled by the vice skip. No players other than the vice skip from each team should be in the house while score is being determined.

In tournament play, the most frequent circumstance in which a decision has to be made by someone other than the vice skip is the failure of the vice skips to agree on which stone is closest to the button.

An independent official supervisor at Canadian and World championships then measures the distances using a specially designed device that pivots at the centre of the button.

When no independent officials are available, the vice skips measure the distances. The winner is the team having the highest number of accumulated points at the completion of ten ends.

Points are scored at the conclusion of each of these ends as follows: Only stones that are in the house are considered in the scoring. A stone is in the house if it lies within the foot 3.

Since the bottom of the stone is rounded, a stone just barely in the house will not have any actual contact with the ring, which will pass under the rounded edge of the stone, but it still counts.

This type of stone is known as a biter. It may not be obvious to the eye which of two rocks is closer to the button centre or if a rock is actually biting or not.

There are specialized devices to make these determinations, but these cannot be brought out until after an end is completed.

Therefore, a team may make strategic decisions during an end based on assumptions of rock position that turn out to be incorrect.

The score is marked on a scoreboard , of which there are two types; the baseball type and the club scoreboard.

The baseball-style scoreboard was created for televised games for audiences not familiar with the club scoreboard. The ends are marked by columns 1 through 10 or 11 for the possibility of an extra end to break ties plus an additional column for the total.

Below this are two rows, one for each team, containing the team's score for that end and their total score in the right hand column.

The club scoreboard is traditional and used in most curling clubs. Scoring on this board only requires the use of up to 11 digit cards, whereas with baseball-type scoring an unknown number of multiples of the digits especially low digits like 1 may be needed.

The numbered centre row represents all possible accumulated scores, and the numbers placed in the team rows represent the end in which that team achieved that cumulative score.

If the red team scores three points in the first end called a three-ender , then a 1 indicating the first end is placed beside the number 3 in the red row.

This scoreboard works because only one team can get points in an end. However, some confusion may arise if neither team scores points in an end, this is called a blank end.

The blank end numbers are usually listed in the farthest column on the right in the row of the team that has the hammer last rock advantage , or on a special spot for blank ends.

The following example illustrates the difference between the two types. The example illustrates the men's final at the Winter Olympics.

Eight points — all the rocks thrown by one team counting — is the highest score possible in an end, and is known as an " eight-ender " or "snowman".

Scoring an eight-ender against a relatively competent team is very difficult; in curling, it is considered the equivalent of pitching a perfect game in baseball.

Probably the best-known snowman came at the Players' Championships. Competition teams are normally named after the skip, for example, Team Martin after skip Kevin Martin.

Amateur league players can and do creatively name their teams, but when in competition a bonspiel the official team will have a standard name.

Top curling championships are typically played by all-male or all-female teams. It is known as mixed curling when a team consists of two men and two women.

For many years, in the absence of world championship or Olympic mixed curling events, national championships of which the Canadian Mixed Curling Championship was the most prominent were the highest-level mixed curling competitions.

A mixed tournament was held at the Olympic level for the first time in , although it was a doubles tournament, not a four-person.

Curling tournaments may use the Schenkel system for determining the participants in matches. Curling is played in many countries, including Canada, the United Kingdom especially Scotland , the United States, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark, Finland and Japan, all of which compete in the world championships.

Curling has been depicted by many artists including: Curling is particularly popular in Canada.

Improvements in ice making and changes in the rules to increase scoring and promote complex strategy have increased the already high popularity of the sport in Canada, and large television audiences watch annual curling telecasts, especially the Scotties Tournament of Hearts the national championship for women , the Tim Hortons Brier the national championship for men , and the women's and men's world championships.

Despite the Canadian province of Manitoba 's small population ranked 5th of 10 Canadian provinces , Manitoban teams have won the Brier more times than teams from any other province.

The Tournament of Hearts and the Brier are contested by provincial and territorial champions, and the world championships by national champions.

Curling is the provincial sport of Saskatchewan. From there Ernie Richardson and his family team dominated Canadian and international curling during the late s and early s and have been considered to be the best male curlers of all time.

When she died two years later from cancer , over 15, people attended her funeral, and it was broadcast on national television. More so than in many other team sports, good sportsmanship, often referred to as the "Spirit of Curling", is an integral part of curling.

In the United States there was even a theology of curling. The Spirit of Curling also leads teams to congratulate their opponents for making a good shot, strong sweeping or spectacular form.

Perhaps most importantly, the Spirit of Curling dictates that one never cheers mistakes, misses or gaffes by one's opponent unlike most team sports and one should not celebrate one's own good shots during the game beyond modest acknowledgement of the shot such as a head nod, fist bump or thumbs-up gesture.

Modest congratulation, however, may be exchanged between winning team members after the match. On-the-ice celebration is usually reserved for the winners of a major tournament after winning the final game of the championship.

It is completely unacceptable to attempt to throw opposing players off their game by way of negative comment, distraction or heckling.

A match traditionally begins with players shaking hands with and saying "good curling" or "have a pleasant game" to each member of the opposing team.

It is also traditional in some areas for the winning team to buy the losing team a drink after the game. It is not uncommon for a team to concede a curling match after it believes it no longer has any hope of winning.

Concession is an honourable act and does not carry the stigma associated with quitting, and also allows for more socializing.

To concede a match, members of the losing team offer congratulatory handshakes to the winning team. Thanks, wishes of future good luck and hugs are usually exchanged between the teams.

To continue playing when a team has no realistic chance of winning can be seen as a breach of etiquette.

Curling has been adapted for wheelchair users and people otherwise unable to throw the stone from the hack. These curlers may use a device known as a "delivery stick".

The cue holds on to the handle of the stone and is then pushed along by the curler. At the end of delivery, the curler pulls back on the cue, which releases it from the stone.

The delivery stick was specifically invented for elderly curlers in Canada in The ice in the game may be fast keen or slow. If the ice is keen, a rock will travel farther with a given amount of weight throwing force on it.

The speed of the ice is measured in seconds. One such measure, known as "hog-to-hog" time, is the speed of the stone and is the time in seconds the rock takes from the moment it crosses the near hog line until it crosses the far hog line.

If this number is lower, the rock is moving faster, so again low numbers mean more speed. The ice in a match will be somewhat consistent and thus this measure of speed can also be used to measure how far down the ice the rock will travel.

Once it is determined that a rock taking for example 13 seconds to go from hog line to hog line will stop on the tee line, the curler can know that if the hog-to-hog time is matched by a future stone, that stone will likely stop at approximately the same location.

As an example, on keen ice, common times might be 16 seconds for guards, 14 seconds for draws, and 8 seconds for peel weight. The back line to hog line speed is used principally by sweepers to get an initial sense of the weight of a stone.

As an example, on keen ice, common times might be 4. Especially at the club level, this metric can be misleading, due to amateurs sometimes pushing stones on release, causing the stone to travel faster than the back-to-hog speed.

Curling is featured prominently in " Boy Meets Curl ", the twelfth episode of the comedy series The Simpsons ' twenty-first season.

The episode aired on the Fox network in the United States on 14 February Men with Brooms is a Canadian film that takes a satirical look at curling.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Curling rink. This article is about the sport. For other uses, see Curling disambiguation.

This article needs additional citations for verification. The national women's curling championship will return to Moose Jaw, Sask.

The experimenting is over for curling's five-rock rule. From the clubs to the world championships, curlers are adapting to the newest wrinkle in the sport this season.

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Fleury, Homan and Gushue qualify for Tour Challenge playoffs. Gushue scores back-to-back wins to open Tour Challenge.

Yellowknife's Team Galusha win first event of season Take a look at all the results from this past weekend in the curling world with TSN.

Clubs closing, but should seek help that is here, says Curling Canada The good news for curling is new rinks are opening. Brier heading to Kingston, Ont.

Beim Spielen eines Steins kann der Spieler nicht nur versuchen, seinen Stein optimal zu platzieren setzen , sondern auch Steine der Gegenmannschaft aus dem Spiel zu befördern. Dazu suchen Sie in anderen Übersetzungswörterbüchern: Curling ist seit den Olympischen Winterspielen in Nagano eine olympische Sportart. Synonyme Synonyme Englisch für "curling": See details and add a comment. Die Winterbilder Pieter Bruegels d. Der Eintrag wurde Ihren Favoriten hinzugefügt. Auch wischt der Lead, nachdem er seine Steine abgespielt hat, die Steine seiner Mitspieler. Senden Sie uns gern einen neuen Eintrag. Diese Sätze sind von externen Quellen und können mitunter Fehler enthalten. Durch enge Beziehungen Schottlands mit Kanada kam diese winterliche Betätigung nach Übersee, wo bald viele Menschen begeistert curlten. Curling ist besonders in Kanada , Schottland , Skandinavien und der Schweiz populär und wird wegen seiner komplexen taktischen Möglichkeiten auch als Schach auf dem Eis bezeichnet. Dass Curling eine olympische Sportart wurde, ist nicht zuletzt dem damaligen Präsidenten des World Curling Federation WCF , Günther Hummelt zu verdanken, unter dessen Amtszeit — Curling als offizielle Olympische Wintersportart anerkannt wurde und bei den Olympischen Winterspielen in Nagano erstmals als 7. Draws are thrown only to reach the house. When the ice in front of the stone is swept, a stone will usually travel both farther and straighter. A handle is attached by a bolt running vertically through a hole in the centre of the stone. Retrieved 20 August Archived from the original curling deutsch 6 July Archived from the original PDF on 10 April These curlers may use a device known as a "delivery stick". Stainless steel was once common for slider soles, and "red Beste Spielothek in Bernbichl finden sliders with lateral blocks of PVC on the sole are also available. If a team does not have the hammer in an end, it will opt to try to clog up the four-foot zone in the house Beste Spielothek in Lethe Kolonie finden deny the opposing team access to the button. The stone is released as the thrower approaches the hog line, casino online merkur spiele which point the turn is imparted by a slight clockwise or counter-clockwise twist of the handle from around the two or ten o'clock position to the gynäkologe minden o'clock on release.

Curling Deutsch Video

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Da das Minimum, um das Recht des letzten Steins zu verlieren, ein Punkt ist, will das Team mit dem letzten Stein möglichst zwei oder mehr Punkte schreiben. Um eine neue Diskussion zu starten, müssen Sie angemeldet sein. Aufrollens in einer thermischen Entwicklungsanlage. Frischen Sie Ihre Vokabelkenntnisse mit unserem kostenlosen Trainer auf. Dadurch wird die Reibung vorne verringert, was zu einer Krümmung der Laufbahn führt.

Two teams, each with four players, take turns sliding heavy, polished granite stones, also called rocks , across the ice curling sheet towards the house , a circular target marked on the ice.

The purpose is to accumulate the highest score for a game ; points are scored for the stones resting closest to the centre of the house at the conclusion of each end , which is completed when both teams have thrown all of their stones.

A game usually consists of eight or ten ends. The curler can induce a curved path by causing the stone to slowly turn as it slides, and the path of the rock may be further influenced by two sweepers with brooms who accompany it as it slides down the sheet, using the brooms to alter the state of the ice in front of the stone.

Sweeping a rock makes it curl less, and decreases the friction that slows the rock down. A great deal of strategy and teamwork go into choosing the ideal path and placement of a stone for each situation, and the skills of the curlers determine the degree to which the stone will achieve the desired result.

This gives curling its nickname of " chess on ice". Evidence that curling existed in Scotland in the early 16th century includes a curling stone inscribed with the date uncovered along with another bearing the date when an old pond was drained at Dunblane, Scotland.

The word curling first appears in print in in Perth, Scotland , in the preface and the verses of a poem by Henry Adamson.

Kilsyth Curling Club claims to be the first club in the world, having been formally constituted in ; [13] it is still in existence today.

In the early history of curling, the playing stones were simply flat-bottomed stones from rivers or fields, which lacked a handle and were of inconsistent size, shape and smoothness.

The sport was often played on frozen rivers although purpose-built ponds were later created in many Scottish towns. In Darvel , East Ayrshire , the weavers relaxed by playing curling matches using the heavy stone weights from the looms' warp beams , fitted with a detachable handle for the purpose.

Many a wife would keep her husband's brass curling stone handle on the mantelpiece, brightly polished until the next time it was needed.

Outdoor curling was very popular in Scotland between the 16th and 19th centuries because the climate provided good ice conditions every winter.

Scotland is home to the international governing body for curling, the World Curling Federation in Perth , which originated as a committee of the Royal Caledonian Curling Club, the mother club of curling.

Today, the sport is most firmly established in Canada , having been taken there by Scottish emigrants. The Royal Montreal Curling Club , the oldest established sports club still active in North America , [25] was established in The first curling club in the United States was established in , and the sport was introduced to Switzerland and Sweden before the end of the 19th century, also by Scots.

The first world championship for curling was limited to men and was known as the Scotch Cup , held in Falkirk and Edinburgh , Scotland , in The first world title was won by the Canadian team from Regina, Saskatchewan , skipped by Ernie Richardson.

The skip is the team member who calls the shots; see below. Curling was one of the first sports that was popular with women and girls. It currently includes men's, women's and mixed doubles tournaments the mixed tournament was held for the first time in In February , the International Olympic Committee retroactively decided that the curling competition from the Winter Olympics originally called Semaine des Sports d'Hiver , or International Winter Sports Week would be considered official Olympic events and no longer be considered demonstration events.

Thus, the first Olympic medals in curling , which at the time was played outdoors, were awarded for the Winter Games, with the gold medal won by Great Britain, two silver medals by Sweden, and the bronze by France.

A demonstration tournament was also held during the Winter Olympic Games between four teams from Canada and four teams from the United States, with Canada winning 12 games to 4.

Since the Olympics, Canada has dominated the sport with their men's teams winning gold in , , and , and silver in and The women's team won gold in and , a silver in , and a bronze in and The mixed doubles team won gold in The shorter borders of the sheet are called the backboards.

Because of the elongated shape, several sheets may be laid out side by side in the same arena, allowing multiple games to be played simultaneously.

A target, the house , is centred on the intersection of the centre line , drawn lengthwise down the centre of the sheet and the tee line , drawn 16 feet 4.

These lines divide the house into quarters. The house consists of a centre circle the button and three concentric rings, of diameters 4, 8 and 12 feet, formed by painting or laying coloured vinyl sheet under the ice and are usually distinguished by colour.

A stone must at least touch the outer ring in order to score see Scoring below ; otherwise the rings are merely a visual aid for aiming and judging which stone is closer to the button.

The hacks are fixed 12 feet 3. A single moveable hack may also be used. The ice may be natural but is usually frozen by a refrigeration plant pumping a brine solution through numerous pipes fixed lengthwise at the bottom of a shallow pan of water.

Most curling clubs have an ice maker whose main job is to care for the ice. At the major curling championships, ice maintenance is extremely important.

It is common for each sheet of ice to have multiple sensors embedded in order to monitor surface temperature, as well as probes set up in the seating area to monitor humidity and in the compressor room to monitor brine supply and return temperatures.

A key part of the preparation of the playing surface is the spraying of water droplets onto the ice, which form pebble on freezing.

The pebbled ice surface resembles an orange peel, and the stone moves on top of the pebbled ice. The amount of curl commonly referred to as the feet of curl can change during a game as the pebble wears; the ice maker must monitor this and be prepared to scrape and re-pebble the surface prior to each game.

The curling stone also sometimes called a rock in North America is made of granite and is specified by the World Curling Federation, which requires a weight between 38 and 44 pounds This concave bottom was first proposed by J.

Russell of Toronto, Ontario, Canada sometime after , and was subsequently adopted by Scottish stone manufacturer Andrew Kay.

The granite for the stones comes from two sources: Blue Hone has very low water absorption, which prevents the action of repeatedly freezing water from eroding the stone.

In the past, most curling stones were made from Blue Hone but the island is now a wildlife reserve and the quarry is restricted by environmental conditions that exclude blasting.

Kays of Scotland has been making curling stones in Mauchline, Ayrshire, since and has the exclusive rights to the Ailsa Craig granite, granted by the Marquess of Ailsa , whose family has owned the island since According to the Census , Andrew Kay employed 30 people in his curling stone factory in Mauchline.

Kays have been involved in providing curling stones for the Winter Olympics since Chamonix in and has been the exclusive manufacturer of curling stones for the Olympics since the Winter Olympics.

Trefor granite comes in shades of pink, blue and grey. A handle is attached by a bolt running vertically through a hole in the centre of the stone.

The handle allows the stone to be gripped and rotated upon release; on properly prepared ice the rotation will bend curl the path of the stone in the direction in which the front edge of the stone is turning, especially as the stone slows.

Handles are coloured to identify each team, two popular colours in major tournaments being red and yellow.

In competition, an electronic handle known as the eye on the hog may be fitted to detect hog line violations. This electronically detects whether the thrower's hand is in contact with the handle as it passes the hog line and indicates a violation by lights at the base of the handle.

The eye on the hog eliminates human error and the need for hog line officials. The curling broom , or brush , is used to sweep the ice surface in the path of the stone see sweeping and is also often used as a balancing aid during delivery of the stone.

Prior to the s, most curling brooms were made of corn strands and were similar to household brooms of the day.

In , Fern Marchessault of Montreal inverted the corn straw in the centre of the broom. This style of corn broom was referred to as the Blackjack.

Artificial brooms made from man-made fabrics rather than corn, such as the Rink Rat , also became common later during this time period. Prior to the late sixties, Scottish curling brushes were used primarily by some of the Scots, as well as by recreational and elderly curlers, as a substitute for corn brooms, since the technique was easier to learn.

In the late sixties, competitive curlers from Calgary , Alberta , such as John Mayer, Bruce Stewart, and, later, the world junior championship teams skipped by Paul Gowsell , proved that the curling brush could be just as or more effective without all the blisters common to corn broom use.

Eventually, the brush won out with the majority of curlers making the switch to the less costly and more efficient brush.

Today, brushes have replaced traditional corn brooms at every level of curling; it is rare now to see a curler using a corn broom on a regular basis.

Curling brushes may have fabric, hog hair, or horsehair heads. Modern curling brush handles are usually hollow tubes made of fibreglass or carbon fibre instead of a solid length of wooden dowel.

These hollow tube handles are lighter and stronger than wooden handles, allowing faster sweeping and also enabling more downward force to be applied to the broom head with reduced shaft flex.

New, "directional fabric" brooms, which players are worried will alter the fundamentals of the sport by reducing the level of skill required, have been accused of giving players an unfair advantage.

The new brooms give sweepers unprecedented control over the direction the stone goes. Curling shoes are similar to ordinary athletic shoes except that they have dissimilar soles; the slider shoe usually known as a "slider" is designed for the sliding foot and the "gripper shoe" usually known as a gripper for the hack foot.

The slider is designed to slide and typically has a Teflon sole. It is worn by the thrower during delivery from the hack and by sweepers or the skip to glide down the ice when sweeping or otherwise traveling down the sheet quickly.

Stainless steel was once common for slider soles, and "red brick" sliders with lateral blocks of PVC on the sole are also available.

Most shoes have a full-sole sliding surface, but some shoes have a sliding surface covering only the outline of the shoe and other enhancements with the full-sole slider.

Some shoes have small disc sliders covering the front and heel portions or only the front portion of the foot, which allow more flexibility in the sliding foot for curlers playing with tuck deliveries.

Ordinary athletic shoes may be converted to sliders by using a step-on or slip-on Teflon slider or by applying electrical or gaffer tape directly to the sole or over a piece of cardboard.

This arrangement often suits casual or beginning players. The gripper is worn by the thrower on the hack foot during delivery and is designed to grip the ice.

It may have a normal athletic shoe sole or a special layer of rubbery material applied to the sole of a thickness to match the sliding shoe.

The toe of the hack foot shoe may also have a rubberised coating on the top surface or a flap that hangs over the toe to reduce wear on the top of the shoe as it drags on the ice behind the thrower.

The purpose of a game is to score points by getting stones closer to the house centre, or the "button", than the other team's stones.

An end is complete when all eight rocks from each team have been delivered, a total of sixteen stones. If the teams are tied at the end of the game, play continues for as many ends as may be required to break the tie.

The winner is the team with the highest score after all ends have been completed see Scoring below. A game may be conceded if considered unwinnable.

International competitive games are generally ten ends, so most of the national championships that send a representative to the World Championships or Olympics also play ten ends.

However, there is a movement on the World Curling Tour to make the games only eight ends. In international competition, each side is given 73 minutes to complete all of its throws.

Each team is also allowed two minute-long timeouts per end game. If extra ends are required, each team is allowed 10 minutes of playing time to complete its throws and one added second timeout for each extra end.

However, the "thinking time" system, in which the delivering team's game timer stops as soon as the shooter's rock crosses the t-line during the delivery, is becoming more popular, especially in Canada.

This system allows each team 38 minutes per 10 ends, or 30 minutes per 8 ends, to make strategic and tactical decisions, with 4 minutes and 30 seconds an end for extra ends.

The skip , or the captain of the team, will usually determine the required weight , turn , and line of the stone.

These will be influenced by the tactics at this point in the game, which may involve taking out, blocking or tapping another stone.

The skip may communicate the weight , turn , line, and other tactics by calling or tapping a broom on the ice. In the case of a takeout, guard, or a tap, the skip will indicate the stones involved.

Before delivery, the running surface of the stone is wiped clean and the path across the ice swept with the broom if necessary, because any dirt on the bottom of a stone or in its path can alter the trajectory and ruin the shot.

Intrusion by a foreign object is called a pick-up or pick. The thrower throws from the hack. Another player, usually the skip, is stationed behind the button to determine the tactics, weight , turn , and line , and the other two may sweep in front of the stone to influence the trajectory see Sweeping , below.

The players, with the exception of the skip, take turns throwing and sweeping; when one player e. When the skip throws, the third, or vice-skip, takes his role.

The thrower's gripper shoe with the non-slippery sole is positioned against one of the hacks; for a right-handed curler the right foot is placed against the left hack and vice versa for a left-hander.

The thrower, now in the hack , lines the body up with shoulders square to the skip's broom at the far end for line.

The stone is placed in front of the foot now in the hack. Rising slightly from the hack, the thrower pulls the stone back some older curlers may actually raise the stone in this backward movement then lunges smoothly out from the hack pushing the stone ahead while the slider foot is moved in front of the gripper foot, which trails behind.

The thrust from this lunge determines the weight and hence the distance the stone will travel. While not compulsory, most curlers deliver the stone while sliding out from the hack.

Balance may be assisted by a broom held in the free hand with the back of the broom down so that it slides. One older writer suggests the player keep "a basilisk glance" at the mark.

There are two current types of delivery, the common flat-foot deliver as well as the Manitoba tuck delivery where the curler slides on the front ball of his foot.

The stone is released as the thrower approaches the hog line, at which point the turn is imparted by a slight clockwise or counter-clockwise twist of the handle from around the two or ten o'clock position to the twelve o'clock on release.

The stone must be released before its front edge crosses the near hog line, and it must clear the far hog line or else be removed from play hogged ; an exception is made if a stone fails to come to rest beyond the far hog line after rebounding from a stone in play just past the hog line.

The release rule is rarely enforced in club play unless abuse is suspected. However, in major tournaments it is strictly enforced; the "eye on the hog" sensor in the stone will indicate whether the stone has been legally thrown or not.

The lights on the stone handle will either light up green, indicating that the stone has been legally thrown, or red, in which case the illegally thrown stone will be immediately pulled from play instead of waiting for the stone to come to rest.

After the stone is delivered, its trajectory is still influenced by the two sweepers under instruction from the skip.

Sweeping is done for several reasons: When sweeping, pressure and speed of the brush head are key in slightly increasing the layer of moisture that builds up under the stone.

One of the basic technical aspects of curling is knowing when to sweep. When the ice in front of the stone is swept, a stone will usually travel both farther and straighter.

In some situations, one of the two alterations in path is not desirable. For example, a stone may have too much weight, but require sweeping to prevent curling into a guard.

The team must decide which is better: Much of the yelling that goes on during a curling game is the skip calling the line of the shot and the sweepers calling the weight.

The skip evaluates the path of the stone and calls to the sweepers to sweep as necessary to maintain the intended track.

The sweepers themselves are responsible for judging the weight of the stone, ensuring the length of travel is correct and communicating the weight of the stone back to the skip.

Some teams use stopwatch timing, from back line to the nearest hog line as a sweeping aid. Many teams use the Number System to communicate in which of 10 playable zones it is estimated the stone will stop.

Usually, the two sweepers will be on opposite sides of the stone's path, although depending on which side the sweepers' strengths lie this may not always be the case.

Speed and pressure are vital to sweeping. In gripping the broom, one hand should be one third of the way from the top non-brush end of the handle while the other hand should be one third of the way from the head of the broom.

The angle of the broom to the ice should be so that the most force possible can be exerted on the ice.

The precise amount of pressure may vary from relatively light brushing "just cleaning" - to ensure debris will not alter the stone's path to maximum-pressure scrubbing.

Sweeping is allowed anywhere on the ice up to the tee line , as long as it is only for one's own team stones. Once the leading edge of a team stone crosses the tee line only one player may sweep it.

Additionally, when a stone crosses the tee line, one player from the other team is allowed to sweep it.

This is the only case that a stone may be swept by an opposing team member. In international rules, this player must be the skip; or if the skip is throwing, then the sweeping player must be the third.

Occasionally, players may accidentally touch a stone with their broom or a body part. This is often referred to as burning a stone.

Players touching a stone in such a manner are expected to call their own infraction as a matter of good sportsmanship.

Touching a stationary stone when no stones are in motion there is no delivery in progress is not an infraction unless the stationary stone is struck in such a manner that its position is altered , and is a common way for the skip to indicate a stone that is to be taken out.

When a stone is touched when stones are in play, the remedies vary [31] [54] between placing the stones as they end up after the touch, replacing the stones as they would have been if no stone were touched, or removal of the touched stone from play.

In non-officiated league play, the skip of the non-offending team has the final say on where the stones are placed after the infraction.

Many different types of shots are used to carefully place stones for strategic or tactical reasons; they fall into three fundamental categories as follows:.

Guards are thrown in front of the house in the free guard zone , usually to protect the shot-rock the stone closest to the button at the time or to make the opposing team's shot difficult.

Guard shots include the centre-guard , on the centreline and the corner-guards to the left or right sides of the centre line. See Free Guard Zone below.

Draws are thrown only to reach the house. Draw shots include raise and angle-raise , come-around , and freeze shots.

Takeouts are intended to remove stones from play and include the peel , hit-and-roll and double shots. For a more complete listing, see Glossary of curling terms.

Until five stones have been played three from the side without hammer, and two from the side with hammer , stones in the free guard zone stones left in the area between the hog and tee lines, excluding the house may not be removed by an opponent's stone, although they can be moved as long as they are not taken out of play.

These are known as guard rocks. If a guard rock is removed under this rule, it is placed back in the positions it was in before the shot was thrown, and the opponent's stone is removed from play and cannot be replayed.

This rule is known as the five-rock rule or the free guard zone rule previous versions of the free guard zone rule only limited removing guards from play in the first three or four rocks, known as the "three-rock rule" and "four-rock rule" respectively.

This rule, a relatively recent addition to curling, was added in response to a strategy of "peeling" opponents' guard stones knocking them out of play at an angle that caused the shooter's stone to also roll out of play, leaving no stones on the ice.

A team in the lead would often employ this strategy during the game. By knocking all stones out, the opponents could at best score one point if they had the hammer.

Alternatively, the team with the hammer could peel rock after rock, which would blank the end, keeping the last rock advantage for another end. This strategy had developed mostly in Canada as ice-makers had become skilled at creating a predictable ice surface and the adoption of brushes allowed greater control over the rock.

While a sound strategy, this made for an unexciting game. Observers at the time noted that if two teams equally skilled in the peel game faced each other on good ice, the outcome of the game would be predictable from who won the coin flip to have last rock or had earned it in the schedule at the beginning of the game.

The Brier was considered by many curling fans as boring to watch because of the amount of peeling and the quick adoption of the Free Guard Zone the following year reflected how disliked this aspect of the game had become.

The free guard zone was originally called the Modified Moncton Rule and was developed from a suggestion made by Russ Howard for the Moncton cashspiel with the richest prize ever awarded at the time in a tournament in Moncton , New Brunswick , in January This method of play was altered by restricting the area in which a stone was protected to the free guard zone only for the first four rocks thrown and adopted as a Four-rock Free Guard Zone for international competition shortly after.

Canada kept to the traditional rules until a three-rock Free Guard Zone rule was adopted for the —94 season. After several years of having the three-rock rule used for the Canadian championships and the winners then having to adjust to the four-rock rule in the World Championships, the Canadian Curling Association adopted the four-rock Free Guard Zone in the — season.

One strategy that has been developed by curlers in response to the Free Guard Zone Kevin Martin from Alberta is one of the best examples is the "tick" game, where a shot is made attempting to knock tick the guard to the side, far enough that it is difficult or impossible to use but still remaining in play while the shot itself goes out of play.

The effect is functionally identical to peeling the guard but significantly harder, as a shot that hits the guard too hard knocking it out of play results in its being replaced, while not hitting it hard enough can result in its still being tactically useful for the opposition.

There is also a greater chance that the shot will miss the guard entirely because of the greater accuracy required to make the shot. Because of the difficulty of making this type of shot, only the best teams will normally attempt it, and it does not dominate the game the way the peel formerly did.

Steve Gould from Manitoba popularized ticks played across the face. These are easier to make because they impart less speed on the object stone, therefore increasing the chance that it remains in play even if a bigger chunk of it is hit.

With the tick shot reducing the effectiveness of the four-rock rule, the Grand Slam of Curling series of bonspiels adopted a five-rock rule in Last-rock or last-stone advantage in an end is called the hammer.

Before the game, teams typically decide who gets the hammer in the first end either by chance such as a coin toss , by a "draw-to-the-button" contest, where a representative of each team shoots to see who gets closer to the centre of the rings, or, particularly in tournament settings like the Winter Olympics, by a comparison of each team's win-loss record.

In all subsequent ends, the hammer belongs to the team that did not score in the preceding end. In the event that neither team scores, the hammer remains with the same team.

Naturally, it is easier to score points with the hammer than without; in tournament play, the team with the hammer generally tries to score two or more points.

If only one point is possible, the skip will often try to avoid scoring at all in order to retain the hammer until the next end, when two or more points may lie.

This is called a blank end. Scoring without the hammer is commonly referred to as stealing , or a steal , and is much more difficult.

Curling is a game of strategy, tactics and skill. The strategy depends on the team's skill, the opponent's skill, the conditions of the ice, the score of the game, how many ends remain and whether the team has last-stone advantage the hammer.

A team may play an end aggressively or defensively. Aggressive playing will put a lot of stones in play by throwing mostly draws; this makes for an exciting game and is very risky but the reward can be very great.

Defensive playing will throw a lot of hits preventing a lot of stones in play; this tends to be less exciting and less risky. A good drawing team will usually opt to play aggressively, while a good hitting team will opt to play defensively.

If a team does not have the hammer in an end, it will opt to try to clog up the four-foot zone in the house to deny the opposing team access to the button.

This can be done by throwing "centre line" guards in front of the house on the centre line, which can be tapped into the house later or drawn around.

If a team has the hammer, they will try to keep this four-foot zone free so that they have access to the button area at all times. A team with the hammer may throw a corner guard as their first stone of an end placed in front of the house but outside the four-foot zone to utilize the free guard zone.

Corner guards are key for a team to score two points in an end, because they can either draw around it later or hit and roll behind it, making the opposing team's shot to remove it more difficult.

Ideally, the strategy in an end for a team with the hammer is to score two points or more. Scoring one point is often a wasted opportunity, as they will then lose last-rock advantage for the next end.

If a team cannot score two points, they will often attempt to "blank an end" by removing any leftover opposition rocks and rolling out; or, if there are no opposition rocks, just throwing the rock through the house so that no team scores any points, and the team with the hammer can try again the next end to score two or more with it.

Generally, a team without the hammer would want to either force the team with the hammer to only one point so that they can get the hammer back or "steal" the end by scoring one or more points of their own.

Generally, the larger the lead a team will have in a game, the more defensively they should play. By hitting all of the opponent's stones, it removes opportunities for their getting multiple points, therefore defending the lead.

If the leading team is quite comfortable, leaving their own stones in play can also be dangerous. Guards can be drawn around by the other team, and stones in the house can be tapped back if they are in front of the tee line or frozen onto if they are behind the tee line.

A frozen stone is difficult to remove, because it is "frozen" in front of and touching to the opponents stone. At this point, a team will opt for "peels", meaning that the stones they throw will be to not only hit their opposition stones, but to roll out of play as well.

Tracy Fleury of East St. Defending champion Brad Gushue is off to a strong start at the Tour Challenge.

Gushue downed Toronto's John Epping in Wednesday's evening draw to move to at the third stop on the Grand Slam of Curling circuit.

Take a look at all the results from this past weekend in the curling world with TSN. The good news for curling is new rinks are opening.

The bad news is even more are closing. The national men's curling championship will be held Feb. Anna Hasselborg scored three points in the eighth end to lift her Swedish rink to an victory over Ottawa's Rachel Homan during Sunday's Canadian Beef Masters women's final.

The national women's curling championship will return to Moose Jaw, Sask. The experimenting is over for curling's five-rock rule. From the clubs to the world championships, curlers are adapting to the newest wrinkle in the sport this season.

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